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Health Care Quality Indicators

Purpose

The purpose of the Health Care Quality Indicators (HCQI) Project is to develop a set of indicators that can be used to raise questions regarding quality of care across countries. They have been reported regularly in a chapter in Health at a Glance publication since 2007.

Objectives and outputs

The entire HCQI database was made available at the OECD.Stat for the first time in 2011. The comparability and quality of data were improved and the database was also expanded, covering patient safety indicators.

Non-member countries involved in the activity:

Cyprus, Latvia, Malta, Singapore.

Databases

HCQI Data Collection

Main Developments for 2012

General aspects:

The HCQI Project goals in 2012 are: to review and refine existing quality of care indicators in prepration for the 2012-13 HCQI Data Collection to commence in November 2012; and to undertake data analysis to support research work in relation to the ongoing priorities of the HCQI Project.

The HCQI project is embarking on further development work with respect to indicator improvement and interpretation of cross country variations.

The main focus is on:

• the development of patient safety and patient experience indicators, and
• the inclusion of data from additional countries.

The HCQI project will also expand work in the construction of more direct measures of primary care quality for understanding observed differences and the cross-national analysis of the quality of primary care performance.

Data management:

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Health Data

Purpose

To provide policy makers and health researchers with a wide range of statistics on health and health systems to allow comparative analysis of different aspects of the performance of health systems. The database includes data on health status and risk factors to health, health care resources and activities, long-term care resources and activities, pharmaceutical consumption, health expenditure and financing, and health care quality. The data come from four questionnaires: 1) the OECD Health Data questionnaire; 2) the joint OECD/Eurostat/WHO (Europe) questionnaire on non-monetary health care statistics; 3) the joint OECD/Eurostat/WHO health accounts questionnaire; and 4) the OECD Health Care Quality Indicators questionnaire.

Objectives and outputs

Progress was achieved in 2011 in improving the availability and comparability of data on different categories of doctors and nurses that are collected throuth the joint OECD/Eurostat/WHO (Europe) questionnaire. The OECD Secretariat has also shared this joint questionnaire with the WHO Western Pacific Regional Office (WPRO) with a view to encourage the use of the same definition of variables for any data collection in that region to promote greater comparability.

Progress has also been achieved in improving the comparability of data on surgical procedures, based on a proposed new standard methodology to count procedures and a better specification of coverage of health care facilities.

A new edition of "Health at a Glance" was released in November 2011, including a new special chapter on long-term care, and data for large emerging economies where possible.

Non-member countries involved in the activity:

Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation, South Africa.

Databases

OECD Health Data 2012

Main Developments for 2012

General aspects:

Improving the availability and comparability of data on health status (morbidity), health inequalities, health care interventions (surgical procedures), and pharmaceutical consumption.

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Health Expenditure and Financing

Purpose

To provide policy relevant, comparative data and analysis on health expenditure and financing, and to facilitate harmonisation across national health accounting practices. To provide data sources for research and to make country-specific health accounts data and analysis more widely available.

Objectives and outputs

The sixth Joint OECD, Eurostat and WHO System Health Accounts (SHA) data collection was successfully implemented in 2011. It has improved the availability and comparability of health expenditure data and also contributed to the improvement in health expenditure data published in OECD Health Data. A System of Health Accounts database has been developed as a component of the OECD Statistical Information System. National Health Accounts Experts and others interested in accessing health accounts data can now do so using OECD.Stat and SourceOECD.

Methodological developmental work has continued over recent years on a number of projects: Improving the Comparability and Availability of Private Health Expenditure; Development of Output based Health-Specific Purchasing Power Parities; Estimating Expenditure by Disease, Age and Gender; and Improving Estimates of Imports and Exports of Health Goods and Services.

Since 2006 OECD, EUROSTAT and WHO collaborated to revise the System of Health Accounts methodology. This process was concluded in October 2011 with the publication of the new manual A System of Health Accounts 2011. Pilot studies are currently undertaken to test the implementation of the new manual.

Non-member countries involved in the activity:

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, China, Croatia, Cyprus, India, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Republic of Montenegro, Republic of Serbia, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia, South Africa

Databases

OECD Health Expenditure and Financing

Main Developments for 2012

General aspects:

In 2012, the seventh Joint OECD-Eurostat-WHO health accounts (SHA) data collection will take place. Previous improvements to the validation tools used both by the national compilers and the international organisations will continue to provide efficiency gains in the validation exercise and ultimately feed through to improved timeliness in dissemination of the data.

Data collection:

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Mental Health, Disability and Work

Purpose

In the late 2000s, the OECD Review "Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers" concluded that policy has changed very much in many countries but not enough in most cases; by and large policies remain too passive in nature. The review identified two big questions to be addressed more fervently: First, why so many people take leave of absence or apply for a disability benefit on the grounds of mental illness; and secondly, how people with mental health conditions could be better integrated into the labour market. The new OECD Review "Disability and Work: Challenges for Labour Market Inclusion of People with Mental Illness" aims to address these two questions, by drawing lessons from policies and outcomes in ten member countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States). See www.oecd.org/els/disability.

Objectives and outputs

A data questionnaire was sent to ten member countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) participating in the new OECD Review "Disability and Work: Challenges for Labour Market Inclusion of People with Mental Illness".

The first report "Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work" was released on 12 December 2011, with a dissemination seminar at the OECD headquarters in Paris. It served as a basis for the next phase of the project which will look in depth into the challenges and policies of selected OECD countries. See www.oecd.org/els/disability.

Main Developments for 2012

General aspects:

Development Preparation of comparative indicators and analysis on the relationship between mental health conditions, work and benefit recipiency; based on data received from ten OECD countries. The reports and the indicators will inform the second phase of the project which aims to provide evidence-based policy conclusions for the countries participating in the project.